REMEMBERING GEORGE WATSON SPLAWN

Born June 26, 1894 at Greenwood, Texas, George received his early education in the public schools.  In 1914 he joined the Class of 1917 at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas where he was a member of Company I, 3rd Battalion, Corps of Cadets and served with the Bugle Corps.  After three years at A&M, he transferred to the North Texas State Normal College at Denton, Texas.  On February 23, 1918 he was inducted into the U.S. Army at Hall County, Texas and sent to his initial training at Camp Travis in San Antonio.  Promoted to the rank of corporal and assigned to Company E, 359th Infantry, 90th Division, he sailed with his unit to France on June 20, 1918 and immediately went into action.  By August George had been promoted to sergeant and was leading men in the fighting around St. Mihiel and into the Meuse-Argonne campaign.  It was during this combat that he was wounded.  George lived long enough to see the Armistice on November 11, 1918, but died of his wounds fifteen days later.  His father received his World War I Victory Medal with three battle clasps: St. Mihiel, Meuse Argonne and Defensive Sector.  On April 26, 1919, the Normal College at Denton held a memorial service for George and ten of his fellow classmates that “commemorated the greatest of sacrifices.”  When George’s sister married, she named two sons after him: William Watson Clifton and George William Clifton.  The photo here is in the possession of William “Bill” Watson Clifton, Jr., Texas Aggie Class of 1974.  The Brazos County World War I Centennial Committee honored his sacrifice on May 29, 2017 as a member of the Texas Aggie Class of 1917

Splawn cropped
George Watson Splawn ’17

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s